Corrosive Post-Punk Band Plays Rare SF Shows (Shellac – Wed. 10/10 & Thurs. 10/11 at GAMH)


While Shellac band hasn’t released any new music since its acclaimed 2015 effort Dude Incredible (its first in seven years), that won’t keep fans from turning out in large numbers to witness one of the most intense post-punk acts working today. Ahead of an appearance at the eclectic Desert Daze Festival in Southern California this weekend, Shellac plays two nights at the Great American Music Hall in San Francisco starting Wednesday night with support from experimental Brooklyn-based indie-rock duo Buke and Gase. - KPIX / CBS SF BayArea

Ben Morrison of The Brothers Comatose reflects on Slim’s at 30 years (performing with Four Year Bender on Wed. 9/19)


South of Market music club Slim's is celebrating its 30th anniversary this week with a lineup of shows while highlighting its rich history as a hub for music in San Francisco.

The anniversary week lineup includes locals The Brothers Comatose, and singer-songwriter Ben Morrison, who once worked at the club, wrote about a couple of his most memorable experiences on the job as a skinny security guard. - RIFF Magazine

We love you, Ben! Excited to see you on our stage (again) tomorrow with Four Year Bender!

READ ON...

SF Chronicle: Slim’s nightclub celebrates 30 years by looking back, moving forward


Slim’s is celebrating its 30th anniversary this month the best way it knows how. Starting Monday, Sept. 17, the South of Market nightclub will host a weeklong concert series with more than a dozen acts, including indie rockers Built to Spill, thrash metal veterans Exodus, bluegrass outfit Brothers Comatose, the pop-punk band Aquabats and blues guitarist Elvin Bishop.

Since opening its doors in 1988, the low-profile venue at 333 11th St. has served as a nerve center for the San Francisco music scene. It’s the place where big-time acts like Radiohead, Bruno Mars and Beck staged their first Bay Area concerts.

The 500-person capacity club has also provided a home for local acts making their way into the world, left-field musicians who don’t quite fit into traditional rock clubs and road warriors simply seeking to reconnect with their fans in a more intimate setting (Pearl Jam, David Bowie, Foo Fighters, Snoop Dogg and Metallica all played shows there — often incognito — at the height of their careers). - SF Chronicle

Read more HERE

Slim’s 30th Anniversary Celebration: Blues & Soul Revue – Fri. 9/21


Hard to believe it was three decades ago that Boz Scaggs opened the SOMA club Slim’s with a blast of blues and boogie woogie. Soul is on the menu for the venue’s 30th anniversary celebration. Blues great Elvin Bishop is the headliner, but my money is on the incandescent soul crooner Wee Willie Walker, whose career has taken off in his eighth decade. Backed by the talent-laden Anthony Paule Soul Orchestra, he’s been performing around the world, often joined by Oakland blues star Terrie Odabi Vocalist. With the powerhouse gospel combo The Sons of The Soul Revivers summoning the spirit, the program offers a serious salve for unsettling times. - Andrew Gilbert / San Francisco Classical Voice

Rounding out this amazing line-up on Fri. 9/21? Kid Andersen & Little Village Foundation's Jim Pugh!

A portion of the proceeds from this very special evening will benefit KPOO Radio.

Guitar Player Presents The Marcus King Band + Bishop Gunn (Tues. 9/11 – GAMH)


GP loves to share in the rise of prodigal talents, and Marcus King graced the cover of the September 2017 “Youthquake” issue because he dazzles on every level—chops, soul, creativity, and transcendental live performance. King and his band throw down jazz-tinged Southern rock and blues with a level of intensity and virtuosity that brings the early years of the Derek Trucks Band to mind. The slide virtuoso showed his respect for King by guesting on “Self Hatred” from the Marcus King Band’s self-titled sophomore effort that was released in 2016 and produced by Warren Haynes.

In late September the Marcus King Band debuted “Homesick” and “Welcome ’Round Here” heralding Carolina Confessions, produced by Dave Cobb (Chris Stapleton, Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson) and scheduled for release October 5th on Fantasy Records. It showcases the 22-year-old King’s maturation as a songwriter and includes a co-write with The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach. - Guitar Player

Tanya Donelly reunites Belly for first tour in more than 20 years (Fri. 8/10 at GAMH)


Earlier this year, Tanya Donelly, who has played with Throwing Muses and the Breeders, got her band Belly back together.

With all the original members on board — bassist Gail Greenwood, guitarist Chris Gorman and drummer Tom Gorman — the group released its first album in 23 years, “Dove,” and is now on the road performing the new material alongside its ’90s indie hits “Feed the Tree” and “Gepetto.” Their next stop: San Francisco’s Great American Music Hall on Friday, Aug. 10. - SF Chronicle 

Jimmie Dale Gilmore sings the blues with Dave Alvin (Fri. 7/27 at GAMH with Jon Langford’s Four Lost Souls)


Honey-throated alt-country singer Jimmie Dale Gilmore knows how strange it sounded in theory for him to team with gruff rockabilly growler and ex-Blaster guitarist Dave Alvin for “Downey to Lubbock,” their new YepRoc collection of duets on mostly vintage-blues covers. But in practice, it made sense.

“It turned out that Dave and I had a whole lot of repertoire in common,” says the Austin native, who hits San Francisco with Alvin this week. “He’s a few years younger than me, but we both had been into the exact same music back when we were learning how to play.”

Click HERE for the SF Examiner interview!

Donna Missal breaks out with ‘Keep Lying’ (Tues. 7/24 at GAMH with King Princess – SOLD OUT!)


Donna Missal was a toddler when her renowned record producer father Steve Missal closed up New York shop and moved his family to suburban New Jersey, where he planned to quit the business. But old habits died hard. “My dad just couldn’t get rid of his great old equipment, so he built a full-fledged recording studio in our basement, where I grew up making music and singing with him, and by 4 I was already making full albums for my grandparents,” says Missal, 27. Despite never taking stardom seriously, she’s about to release her soulful Harvest debut disc “This Time.” She owes it all to one track, the current single “Keep Lying,” which changed her life.

Click HERE for the SF Examiner interview!

Slim’s: One of the SF Bay Area’s best venues is set to celebrate its 30th anniversary – SJ Mercury News


Happy anniversary to Slim’s, Boz Scaggs’ popular San Francisco nightclub that opened back in 1988.

The official anniversary isn’t until mid-September, but you’ll want to act now — and grab some tickets — if you want to join in on all the 30th anniversary fun that the club has planned.

The club has a bunch of cool shows lined up to help mark the big occasion. Here’s the 30th anniversary lineup:

Built to Spill — The celebration kicks off with these influential indie-rock champs; 8 p.m. Sept. 17; $30 advance/$35 door.

Exodus — Legendary thrash-metal act from Richmond; 8 p.m. Sept. 18/ $30 advance/$35 door.

The Brothers Comatose — Lively Bay Area bluegrass act that is anything but “comatose” in concert; 8 p.m. Sept. 19; $20 advance/$25 door.

The Aquabats! — Ska-pop superheros from Orange County; 7:30 p.m. Sept. 20; $30 advance/$32 door.

Blues & Soul Revue — Featuring special guests Elvin Bishop, Sugaray Rayford, Wee Willie Walker, Terrie Odabi, The Anthony Paule Soul Orchestra; 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21, $50 advance/door.

Click HERE for more from the SJ Merc!

Three Must-See Acts This Week La Fleur, Toad the Wet Sprocket (Sat. 7/21 at GAMH), and SHADES – SF Weekly


While many rock bands attempted to fill the grunge-void Nirvana left behind, Toad the Wet Sprocket was on the other end of the alt-rock spectrum, producing a string of delicately crafted melodic-folk albums that would come to define an era that continues to inspire other artists today. The band formed more than 30 years ago when four high school friends in Santa Barbara came together, including vocalist and guitarist Glen Phillips (only 15 at the time). After becoming a mainstay in their local music scene and self-releasing their debut album Bread & Circus in 1989, the quartet broke through to the mainstream with their platinum third studio album Fear, which included hit singles like “All I Want” and “Walk on the Ocean,” both of which are still in frequent rotation on alt-rock radio. The group went on to release two more albums during the decade, Dulcinea and Coil, and while each had its share of hits and acclaim, neither matched the heights of Fear, and the four musicians called it quits in 1998. After brief reunions and flirting with the idea of recording together, Toad the Wet Sprocket officially reformed in 2006, re-recording their older songs due to licensing issues with their discography. Through an enthusiastic crowdfunding campaign, the group released New Constellation in 2013, their first album in 16 years, to critical acclaim, and displayed a wiser, more optimistic version of the group. - SF Weekly

Toad the Wet Sprocket’s Glen Phillips enjoying life in a yurt (Playing GAMH Sat. 7/21 with Megan Slankard & The Wreckage) – SF Examiner


At 47, Glen Phillips is both startled by and pleased with his career longevity. When the Santa Barbara native formed alt-rock outfit Toad the Wet Sprocket in 1986, he was 15, and was 17 when the group signed to major imprint Columbia. He had no idea it would last. But Toad is as vital as ever. The band is on a sprawling tour even as its leader pursues a parallel solo career (he released “Swallowed By the Now” in 2016) that includes musical collaborations and film and TV soundtrack assignments. “Plus, I’ve been living through a pretty wild couple of years, too,” he says.

Click HERE for the SF Examiner's interview!

CBS SF Talks To Brownout’s Beto Martinez About New Public Enemy Tribute (Catch their tribute to Black Sabbath – Brown Sabbath – here at Slim’s this Fri. 6/22!)


The instrumental counterpart of celebrated Grammy Award winning Latin groove ensemble Grupo Fantasma, Austin, TX-based band Brownout has been cultivating a reputation for both fiery live performances and the gritty funk sounds heard on such releases as Homenaje and Aguilas and Cobras that mix heavily fuzzed-out guitars with percolating percussion and intricate horn work reminiscent of ’70s heroes like Mandrill and War.

During a residency at an Austin club, Brownout decided to dedicate certain nights to covering the material of specific artists including a rendition of James Brown’s classic blaxploitation soundtrack “Black Caesar” and an evening dedicated to the music of heavy metal godfathers Black Sabbath.

CBS SF recently spoke to guitarist Beto Martinez about making Fear of a Brown Planet (their recently released tribute to Public Enemy), Brownout’s plans to retire its popular Brown Sabbath guise and plans for new original material. The talk happened just ahead of a string of Bay Area concerts by the band that will showcase both the Public Enemy covers (in Santa Cruz and San Jose) and their funky, horn-powered versions of Black Sabbath’s bruising catalog (in San Francisco and Sacramento). - KPIX CBS San Francisco Bay Area

You definitely don't want to miss this Friday's show! Money Chicha will be getting the night started, and tickets are still available. Read the interview HERE!

1 2 3 8
Top